200 Years, Anniversary Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

haydnmania: the 2009 anniversary

Archive for Schloss Esterhazy

haydn reloaded II – a modern painter’s view

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Maybe you ask yourself, what kind of portrait should this be?
The Austrian painter Andreas Roseneder (alias “René Desor”, here his blog) was in search of clues to between Haydn’s and today’s “affecting” surrounding –  after numerous visits at the Esterházy Castle in Eisenstadt with his Leica.  His new artworks are the result of a 2 years research about Haydn and the people and faces around him: a contemporary view in brilliant artwork quality, made with the newest materials (the paintings here are made with a special kind of acrylic and vinylic colors).
If you visit Esterházy Castle have a look at the “visages” up at the wall of the Castle and courtyard there!

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pictures © Andreas Roseneder, 2007+2008

You feel encircled by curious, funny faces that make grimaces and all are different! Already Joseph Haydn was surrounded by this grimaces when he lived and worked there for 30 years. Andreas Roseneder was inspired by those faces,  remarkable characters to his “haydn_ sketch series”.
(more about the “haydn _portrait series”, the “haydn_muses series” of Andreas Roseneder soon!)
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related article: “haydn reloaded” (with a picture of the “haydn-portrait series” of Andreas Roseneder

“Haydn explosive” – extraordinary tribute to the former employee

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the brochure-cover in the style of “tableau vivant”: “Haydn explosive”, © Esterházy Foundation (picture is a link to the big image, have a look!)
The picture shows some of the protagonists/artists of “Haydn explosive”, e.g. the man with the guitar is the famous Jazz-musician Wolfgang Muthspiel, ….

The Esterházy Private Foundation, successor of the employers of Joseph Haydn (- first Prince Paul Anton Esterházy, later Nikolaus I. Esterházy), the Esterházy management tributes their former employee with extraordinary concerts, exhibitions and a symposion in this year.
What inspired me at once was the – in the truest sense of the word fantastic – advertising concept of “Haydn explosive”:
I became hooked on more pictures like those in the official Esterházy Program!

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The Esterhazy Foundation (domiciled in Eisenstadt and owner of the Esterházy Castle there) has become pioneer and a model for contemporary, modern presentations and events during the recent years. For the first time there is a big culture organizer in Burgenland (East Austria), able to keep up with the innovative “global players” and open minded in their culture work – in comparison to the, more conservative (“business as usual”), official Haydnfestival in Eisenstadt.
Paul Esterházy featured Joseph Haydn, who walked on new ways with his music (that’s a way we call “contemporary” today, yes!) – his successors feature today’s contemporary art!
Thats the way it should be!
“..That’s the way (aha)… I like it (aha) …!!!..”

“Haydn Explosive. A European career at the court of the Esterházy Princes”
programs, dates, locations, information: here

the Haydn-podcast

Austria’s cultural Broadcasting Station “Ö1” offers a “Haydn-Podcast”: documenting Joseph Haydn’s stations in life.
You may follow Joseph Haydn’s journey through Europe in 44 parts during the anniversary-year 2009.
– here the iTunes-Podcast-link “Seeking Haydn”

Guardian’s author Stephen Moss on his “Haydn-Tripp”

An interesting story about his tripp to discover Haydn and “Haydn-Land” wrote Stephen Moss on january 1st 2009 for the “Guardian”.
An article about the “exclusivity” of Haydn – in comparison to Mozart and Beethoven.

– read the article here

– have a look on his pictures here

gold watch for the composer’s pen: Haydn & Nelson

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picture: Lord Nelson before Trafalgar

Precisely how the Nelson Mass became so called, when and by whom shall probably never be known. What is at least clear is that within a month of the Battle of the Nile on august 1, 1798. Haydn had completed a Mass in D Minor, and within months of the Battle of Trafalgar ( october 21, 1805) that same mass had become known as the Nelson Mass.

Amongst his other court duties Haydn was required to produce a new mass each year for the name-day of Princess Esterhazy. Two years previously, in the summer of 1798, Haydn had composed a mass in the key of D minor. He could not have known of the Battle of the Nile until weeks after the mass was finished, so the mass was certainly not written for that Nelson victory. The original manuscript of that mass has neither title nor motto, and bears nothing but the pious formulae ‘In nomine Domini’ at the start and ‘Laus Deo’ at the end.

However, both the Mass in D Minor (probably) and the Te Deum (certainly) were performed to honour Nelson during his visit to Eisenstadt in 1800, together with a brief cantata, Lines from the Battle of the Nile, which Haydn composed for Lady Hamilton. Nelson and Haydn apparently became friends – some accounts tell that Nelson gave Haydn a gold watch he had won at Aboukir Bay, in return for the pen that was used to compose Lady Hamilton’s cantata. It is likely that the name Nelson Mass began being applied to this piece some time after this event, although the name was never used by Haydn himself.

Haydn, the diplomatic musician

The anecdote about the “Farewell Symphony”:
Haydn and the other musicians in the employ of the Esterhazy family spent much of the year staying at Schloss Esterhazy, separated from their wives and families in a remote corner of northwestern Hungary. During one particularly long residency, Haydn composed his “Farewell” Symphony (no. 45), in the last movement of which the instruments drop out of the score one at a time. At the first performance, each player, upon completing his part, blew out his candle and tiptoed away from the orchestra. Prince Esterhazy took the hint, and promptly granted his musicians a well-deserved leave of absence.

Youtube-video from the final concert of the 2008 David Oistrakh Festival in Pärnu, Estonia – Conductor: Neeme Järvi – the last sequences of the Farewell Symphony: