200 Years, Anniversary Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

haydnmania: the 2009 anniversary

Archive for listen to Haydn’s music

Il mondo della luna – premiere

picture: ©Theater an der Wien

Have you ever flown to the moon thanks to nothing more than the power of your own imagination? In the summer of 1777, Joseph Haydn sent the guests at the prince’s wedding in Esterházy Palace into the fantastic universe with the aid of their imagination, some 190 years before the first moon landing. For “Il mondo della luna” he turned to a source that had already been successfully used for a number of operas and was written originally by the Italian comic poet Carlo Goldoni. Haydn created a work focusing on human longings, the fabled moon and a world turned on its head.

Ecclitico is in pursuit of Clarice while Ernesto loves her sister Flaminia. But Buonafede, the father of the two young ladies and an amateur astronomer, is strictly opposed to these matches. He is also suspicious of the growing affection his servant Cecco is showing towards the maid Lisetta, especially since he has his own designs on her. But the young lovers refuse to give in to pressure. They trick the moonstruck Buonafede into believing he has been transported to the moon. A journey of discovery into outer space and the joys of love merge in the family garden into an increasingly manic muddle. The result: a bull’s eye! At the end a triple wedding is in the offing!

In Haydn’s musical evocation of the surface of the moon, there are fragrant flowers and lush woodland instead of rocks and dust, birdsong and lyrically brilliant arias instead of silence. Haydn was internationally renowned for his operas all his life and was even invited to undertake spectacular journeys to England. No wonder, because this score by the wittiest composer of Viennese classical music is simply bursting with creativity and is perfect for becoming “moonstruck”!

Il mondo della luna

composer: Joseph Haydn, in 1777
libretto: Carlo Goldoni
conductor: Nikolaus Harnoncourt
director: Tobias Moretti
orchestra: Concentus Musicus Vienna ( N. Harnoncourt’s orchestra)
Premiere: Sat, 05.12.2009 – 7:00 p.m.

at “Theater an der Wien”

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today, 200 years ago, on may 31, 1809


haydn by Andreas Roseneder

Haydn, modern view – by Andreas Roseneder

Today is the great Anniversary Day for Joseph Haydn! Exactly 200 years ago he died on may 31, 1809 in Vienna in the age of 77.
Among his last words was his attempt to calm and reassure his servants when cannon shot fell in the neighborhood. (The french army under Napoleon was in Vienna):  “My children, have no fear, for where Haydn is, no harm can fall.”
Two weeks later, a memorial service was held in the Schottenkirche on June 15, 1809, at which Mozart’s Requiem was performed. (Mozart died before Haydn, they met 1781 for the first time and stayed friends since Mozart died in 1791)

anniversary_day094
The Anniversary Ceremonies in Eisenstadt began in the middle of the night: at 0.40 a.m. the bells of the Haydnchurch began to ring (it was the hour of Joseph Haydn’s death) and a commemoration was held there.
Todays further program:
at 9.00 a.m. Haydn’s “Schöpfungsmesse” (Creation Mass) is celebrated, with Bishop Dr. Paul Iby, the Hadnorchestra & Choir – (live in ORF)
at 11.00 a.m. Haydn’s “The Creation”, live in TV from the Haydnsaal, Esterhazy Castle: with The Austro-Hungarian Philharmonics under Adam Fischer, with the singer Anette Dasch and Thomas Quasthoff!!!

balthasar_wigand
“The Creation” was played to honour Joseph Haydn at his 76th birthday at the Old University Hall in Vienna on march 27, 1808. Joseph Haydn was there, Antonio Salieri was conducting, Beethoven kissed his hands, the audience was enthusiastic! In the front, sitting on a chair in the middle: Joseph Haydn. – Watercolor by Balthasar Wigand, who was also there.

– and here the (tv-)pictures from “the Creation”, live from Haydnsaal:

Thomas Quasthoff, Anette Dasch

the Creation, J.Haydn

Anette Dasch & Thomas Quasthoff

Präsident Dr. Heinz Fischer, "The Creation" at Esterházy Castle

fischer

I’ll celebrate this day and have a few thankfully thoughts on Haydn!

a special “Haydn-weekend” – on air (tv)!

For those, who aren’t able to watch the Austrian Broadcasting “ORF”, a real great satellite-tipp:
on monday, june 1st 2009, you can watch at the  ORF European satellite-channel the Haydn-documentation “HEUTE SCHON HAYDN GEHÖRT? (“Have you already been listening to Haydn today?”) – 200 years after Joseph Haydn’s death on the trail of the great composer.

june 1, at 5.05 p.m. – ORF 2 Europe (information-pdf, english, spanish, german to download)

Reception
• Satellite ASTRA ORF transponder (117)
• Position 19.2 degrees east
• Frequency 12,692 GHz
• Polarization Horizontal
• Symbol rate 22,000
• FEC 5/6
ORF 2 EUROPE (ORF 2E) is easy to find using the automatic channel search function.
Technology:
ORF 2 EUROPE is a free-to-air channel available through the ASTRA digital satellite – its reception requires a digital satellite reception set.

If there’s a possibility to post a stream-link to the Haydn-live-event “The Creation, live from Eisenstadt”
(with the Austria-Hungarian-Haydn-Philharmonie and the Vienna Chamberchoir, directed by  Adam Fischer – and the singer Annette Dasch, Thomas Quasthoff and Christoph Strehlon)
on sunday, june 31, I’ll post it here!

Sir Simon Rattle about Joseph Haydn’s music

Enjoy listening (it’s audio with pictures – no video at all!) to Sir Simon Rattle’s explanatory notes to Joseph Haydn’s music, especially the Symphony No 88.

“… For me he’s the greatest underrated composer who’s ever been…” … “I’m crazy about this music ..”

an outstanding piece of J.H.-music, “jazzy”!

Famous international Jazz-musician Wynton Marsalis plays the Haydn Trumpet Concerto, with the English Chamber Orchestra conducted by Raymond Leppard.

who cares about the miserable image quality – when you’re able to listen to that?!!!

1st movement:

2nd movement:

3rd movement

CD Wynton Marsalis “Haydn: Three Favorite Concertos”
CD on Amazon
MP3 on iTunes

originality due to isolation – Nikolaus Harnoncourt about Haydn

These days Nikolaus Harnoncourt‘s statement about Joseph Haydn was published.  He said, that Haydn was always willing to risk the newest. The reason was the isolation and originality of Haydn. He was not influenzed by others – the Esterházy Castle in Eisenstadt (where Haydn lived for 30 years) was far away from any scenery – and therefore Joseph Haydn didn’t have to continue any method or habit.

Harnoncourt also said that Haydn had his own ( excellent & international !) orchester and his own audience, so he was extremely independent.
Haydn was an exception owing to those circumstances.

Nikolaus Harnoncourt himself became tasted by Haydn’s music in his student years. Even his parents liked to play chamber music of Haydn. When Nikolaus Harnoncout founded the Concentus with his wife they had just Haydn on their first program!

How would he describe Haydn? – he was asked.

“…If someone has an idea of Haydn, then I would describe Haydn as one of the few musical universal genius. And the second sentence would be: With an extra bit of humour,” said Harnoncourt.

Harnoncourt conducts Haydn (2009, vienna) – video:


tipp
Spring begins (on saturday, 21 march 09) with a special Haydn-evening at “3sat”-TV
with
“Joseph Haydn: my language is understood throughout the world” (at 20.15 p.m.) and

Joseph Haydn’s  “Te Deum für Fürst Nikolaus Esterhazy” C-Dur HOB 23 (at 23.05 p.m.)

(3sat on Satelite: “ASTRA” (1F) auf 19,2 Degree East, Transponder 10, vertical Polarisation, Frequenz 11,347 Ghz, Stereo 7.02 / 7.20, Monoton on 6.50 )

links:
Nikolaus Harnoncourt conducts the Haydn-Anniversary-Opening (warning: no tickets available !!!), here the program on his personal website
wiki

whow, that’s not just for listening …

Joseph Haydn: “Symphony in B-Major, Nr. 16”, Hob. 1:16
composed in the years 1760 to 1763, at a time when he tried a lot of new techniques  – and, at this time not usual  instrumentation.
(it was also the time 1760, when he married a wife who didn’t make him happy during their lifetime – so maybe, music was some kind of escaping too …?!)

What I personally like most is the solocello in the second movement, the “Adagio”. Listen to it, you’ll not regret!

the complete symphony:

1. movement: “Allegro” (get a premonition)

2. movement: “Andante Ma Non Troppo” (!!! my favorite)

3. movement: “Finale, Presto” (a kick to regain your momentum)