200 Years, Anniversary Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

haydnmania: the 2009 anniversary

Archive for farewell symphony

Haydn, the avantgardist

Not only Mozart, also the music publishers and organizers at Haydn’s lifetime knew immediately that there was a composer on completely new ways.
“Nobody can do almost everything as well as Haydn”, Mozart said. For Mozart Haydn was his great role model. (he dedicated 6 string-quartetts to Haydn, more)
Even the implementation of joke  and humor into the music, the evolution of the string quartet and the symphony composition characterized the genius of Haydn.
Generations had – and will have – fun with Haydn’s musically jokes, e.g. with the “Farewell-Symphony”.

sometimes humor is a good way …

Haydn’s clear advice to his employer and sovereign Prince Esterházy, the “Farewell Symphony” was part of the New Years Concert program this year and amused along with the audience at the “Wiener Konzertverein” also millions who watched the concert on TV.

Joseph Haydn, Symphony Nr45, “The Farewell-Symphony”, last movement, in Vienna (Austria) on New Years Day by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Vienna’s “New Years Day Concert 2009”, Conductor: Daniel Barrenboim.

Have fun with Haydn and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra!!

for more information read one of my further articles about the “farewell Symphony” here

nicknames for Haydn’s Symphonies

There are many notable work among Haydn’s Symphonies, and many have nicknames of which the following is a brief overview:

  • Symphony No.31 – “The Horn Signal”
  • Symphony No.45 – “The Farewell”
  • Symphonies No.82-87 – “The Paris Symphonies” commissioned by a Paris publishing house
  • Symphony No.82 – “The Bear” from the folk dance style of the last movement
  • Symphony No.83 – “The Hen” has a clucking theme in the first movement
  • Symphony No.85 – “The Queens” since it was enjoyed by Marie Antoinette
  • Symphony No.88 – this has no nickname but is an absolute delight, a perfect gem
  • Symphony No.92 – “The Oxford” for Oxford University
  • Symphonies No.93-104 – “The London Symphonies” composed in groups during Haydn’s visits to the city
  • Symphony No.94 – “The Surpise” is one of the best-known of Haydn’s symphonies and named for the surprisingly loud chord in the slow movement
  • Symphony No.100 – “The Military” features drums and other percussion
  • Symphony No.101 – “The Clock” for it’s ticking sound
  • Symphony No.103 – “The Drum Roll”
  • Symphony No.104 – “The London”

Haydn, the diplomatic musician

The anecdote about the “Farewell Symphony”:
Haydn and the other musicians in the employ of the Esterhazy family spent much of the year staying at Schloss Esterhazy, separated from their wives and families in a remote corner of northwestern Hungary. During one particularly long residency, Haydn composed his “Farewell” Symphony (no. 45), in the last movement of which the instruments drop out of the score one at a time. At the first performance, each player, upon completing his part, blew out his candle and tiptoed away from the orchestra. Prince Esterhazy took the hint, and promptly granted his musicians a well-deserved leave of absence.

Youtube-video from the final concert of the 2008 David Oistrakh Festival in Pärnu, Estonia – Conductor: Neeme Järvi – the last sequences of the Farewell Symphony: