200 Years, Anniversary Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

haydnmania: the 2009 anniversary

Archive for Hungaria

what happend today (236 years ago!):

Sept 2, 1773:
PHILEMON UND BAUCIS – Joseph Haydn’s Marionette Opera had premiere at Esterháza (now known as Esterházy Palace, at Fertöd, Hungary)

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more:

“If  I want to hear good opera I must come to Eszterháza,” Maria Theresa is supposed to have said, giving a somewhat misleading impression. In fact she was there on only one occasion, for the first two days of September 1773.  The large scale celebrations were written up in local newspaper reports.  On the first day there was a banquet (at which three gamebirds killed by Haydn with one shot were on the Empress’s plate),  the inspection of the Park, a performance of Haydn’s opera “L’infedeltà delusa” in the opera house, followed by a fancy-dress ball which lasted till dawn.  During an intermission in the ball the Prince showed the imperial party his new Chinese Pleasurehouse.  The walls were covered with mirrors which reflected the light of innumerable Chinese lanterns and candles.  Haydn and the orchestra played a symphony and other works.  The main ball took place in a 130 foot long Chinese gallery adjoining the opera house.  Eleven chandeliers and 600 candles illuminated the room and the musicians were dressed in Chinese costume.  It was the stove in this room that exploded in 1779 causing the fire that completely destroyed the first opera house and, far worse, all the music and parts of the operas written to date with the exception of the scores that Haydn had fortuitously taken to his living quarters some half mile away (still preserved).

The next evening’s entertainment started with Haydn’s specially composed marionette opera “Philemon und Baucis”, or “Jupiter’s journey to Earth”. This could well have been the official opening of the marionette theatre, which, unlike the rebuilt opera house and the Chinese Pleasurehouse, still can be seen, although now used for agricultural purposes.  The auditorium was flanked on both sides by caves domed with rockery and sea shells in the fashionable rocaille style. Some of the caves were embellished with fresco paintings, others with miniature fountains.

The puppet opera was followed by a festive supper after which the Prince led the Imperial party through an avenue illuminated with coloured Chinese lanterns to the site of a spectacular firework display.  Once seated the Empress lit the first fuse.  After the fireworks an outdoor ball took place in a specially prepared arena, lit by more than 20,000 Chinese lanterns and with over a thousand young peasants performing local dances.

The opera was repeated at Eszterháza in 1776, presumably with a less elaborate final tableau, and was then available as two pieces, the prologue on Olympus as  “Der Götterrat” and the main opera as “Philemon und Baucis”. At some time in the 19th century the music disappeared completely, though the printed libretto survived.  In 1935 a manuscript score from about 1800 of the main opera was discovered in a Paris bookshop, without the prologue and without the final chorus, but with a lot of extraneous material by other composers that could be discarded thanks to the existence of the libretto.  Music from earlier in the opera is repeated for the final chorus.   It is generally agreed that the first two movements of Symphony No. 50 were the original overture to the prologue.  H. C. Robbins Landon prepared a performing version and produced the first recording in Vienna in 1951.

The tale of Philemon and Baucis appears in Book 8 of  Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Two tree trunks grow together in a walled enclosure on a hilltop, surrounded by a swamp, in Phrygia.  The story is that the gods destroyed the village but left a temple with the old couple to look after it. Their one wish was to die together when their time came and they were transformed into an entwined oak and a lime.  The libretto Haydn set is based on a play by the blind Alsatian poet and teacher, Gottlieb Konrad Pfeffel, presumably found and adapted by the Esterházy librarian, Philipp Georg Bader. Gounod composed a version of the story in 1860. In this very French operetta Baucis asks for the return of her youth, Jupiter falls in love with her and a second wish returns her to Philemon and safe old age.

“Haydn reloded” – exhibition at Esterházy Palace (Fertöd, Hungary)

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“coming home”: Andreas Roseneder transporting (his) Haydn (-patches) over the corridors to the Gallery at Esterháza Palace for his upcoming exhibition

The Austrian artist Andreas Roseneder is preparing his newest exhibition called “Haydn reloaded”, which will take place at the famous Esterházy Palace in Fertöd, Hungary where Haydn lived and worked for so many years.

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2 years artistic work  on the surch of the “authentic portrait” examplified on the great composer – executed in various artistic technics & media can be visited from august 8 to september 6, 2009 at Esterházy Palace, Fertöd, Hungary.

Corr.: because of the big success, “Haydn reloaded” was prolonged until september 27!

Esterházy Palace at youtube:

article on Austrian tv station website about the artist Andreas Roseneder, online (german)

pictures of an exhibition:
some impressions of “Haydn reloaded”

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the artist Andreas Roseneder, with one of his “haydn patches”, leaving Esterházy Palace in a good temper: the exhibition was successful, notes in his guestbook show the enthusiasm of the visitors!

visiting Esterhàza Palace (Fertöd, Hungary)

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Whow, what an impressive ensemble: Esterháza Castle, at Fertöd, Hungary (google map) – just half an hour to go, from the Austria-Hungarian border at Sopron!
1767 Prince Nikolaus (later called “the Magnificent”) visited Versailles and became inspired to build this Castle – on a place that, at this time, was  “in the middle of nowhere”.
1768 also a Opera house was built there – the first performance was Haydn’s opera “Lo speciale”.

the 2 scultpures (here the model) of Haydn (left) and the Prince Esterházy (up on the balcony) will be built in bronce nest year.

the 2 scultptures (here the model) of Haydn (left) and the Prince Esterházy (up on the balcony) will be built in bronce next year.

The most famous and importend people of the aera have spent time here, e.g. Empress Maria Theresia loved to be a guest in Esterháza, ’cause “…if you want to listen to the best music you have to go to Esterháza…”.

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the male’s (prince’s) bedroom with the “secret” door:
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What I have to mention: all the people working in Esterháza were overwhelming friendly and gracious (special thanks to Erna and Tünde!), tried very patiently to answer all our questions and celebrated great hospitality. At least we spent more than 5 hours (!) there – and did not see yet the gigantic historic gardens!
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Prince Paul Anton still lives there, although the Esterháza Palace today belongs to the National Administration Departement of Historical Buildings.

Enjoy a visit there! And one of the exhibitions or one of the many concerts during the Haydn-anniversary-year!
On saturday, august 8, 2009 the opening event of an extraordinary exhibition of contemporary art starts at Esterháza Castle:
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Andreas Roseneder: “Haydn reloaded” – a modern painters view on the genius, his life and works and his surrounding. New paintings and objects as result of Roseneder’s artwork about Haydn.

link: www.mag.hu

“Haydn explosive” – extraordinary tribute to the former employee

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the brochure-cover in the style of “tableau vivant”: “Haydn explosive”, © Esterházy Foundation (picture is a link to the big image, have a look!)
The picture shows some of the protagonists/artists of “Haydn explosive”, e.g. the man with the guitar is the famous Jazz-musician Wolfgang Muthspiel, ….

The Esterházy Private Foundation, successor of the employers of Joseph Haydn (- first Prince Paul Anton Esterházy, later Nikolaus I. Esterházy), the Esterházy management tributes their former employee with extraordinary concerts, exhibitions and a symposion in this year.
What inspired me at once was the – in the truest sense of the word fantastic – advertising concept of “Haydn explosive”:
I became hooked on more pictures like those in the official Esterházy Program!

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The Esterhazy Foundation (domiciled in Eisenstadt and owner of the Esterházy Castle there) has become pioneer and a model for contemporary, modern presentations and events during the recent years. For the first time there is a big culture organizer in Burgenland (East Austria), able to keep up with the innovative “global players” and open minded in their culture work – in comparison to the, more conservative (“business as usual”), official Haydnfestival in Eisenstadt.
Paul Esterházy featured Joseph Haydn, who walked on new ways with his music (that’s a way we call “contemporary” today, yes!) – his successors feature today’s contemporary art!
Thats the way it should be!
“..That’s the way (aha)… I like it (aha) …!!!..”

“Haydn Explosive. A European career at the court of the Esterházy Princes”
programs, dates, locations, information: here

the Haydn-podcast

Austria’s cultural Broadcasting Station “Ö1” offers a “Haydn-Podcast”: documenting Joseph Haydn’s stations in life.
You may follow Joseph Haydn’s journey through Europe in 44 parts during the anniversary-year 2009.
– here the iTunes-Podcast-link “Seeking Haydn”

sometimes humor is a good way …

Haydn’s clear advice to his employer and sovereign Prince Esterházy, the “Farewell Symphony” was part of the New Years Concert program this year and amused along with the audience at the “Wiener Konzertverein” also millions who watched the concert on TV.

Joseph Haydn, Symphony Nr45, “The Farewell-Symphony”, last movement, in Vienna (Austria) on New Years Day by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Vienna’s “New Years Day Concert 2009”, Conductor: Daniel Barrenboim.

Have fun with Haydn and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra!!

for more information read one of my further articles about the “farewell Symphony” here

crazy lovers …

“Chi vive amante… – Ich weiß, dass derjenige, der als Liebhaber lebt, verrückt ist”
(“I know that the one who lives as lover is crazy”)

… is the title of an actually exhibition at Vienna’s Mozarthaus to the 200th anniversary of the death of Joseph Haydn.
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Hieronymus Loeschenkohl: Joseph Haydn, Schattenriss, in: Wiener Musik- und Theater-Almanach auf das Jahr 1786 © Signatur G 87278, Mozarthaus Vienna

The main exhibit of the show is a fair-copy autograph score of the insertion aria “Chi vive amante”, which Haydn had composed for Francesco Bianchi’s opera “Alessandro nell’Indie” for the performance at Esterháza Palace in 1787. The exhibition – which is presented in co-operation with the Vienna City Library – focuses on the autograph score of this aria, which was written in the same year as Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”. In addition to this score there will be registers and libretti, which elucidate the historical context between this work and other operas of that era. The libretto of the then Viennese court poet Pietro Metastasio, on which the opera is based, was not only set to music by Bianchi but several other composers as well. Three printed versions of the libretto referring to the compositions by Baldassare Galuppi (1752), Leonardo Vinci (1783) and a community of composers (1773) will be on view.

Another focus is the historical context of this Haydn aria. Operas of other composers, which were created in Vienna at about the same period as the above-mentioned fragment will be presented: Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” of course, of which the facsimile of a score written by Mozart himself will be shown, or a contemporary copy of the score of “Axur, re d’Ormus” by Antonio Salieri, who at that time had just returned to Vienna from Paris. His opera is an adaptation of the French original version entitled “Tarare” for the Imperial Court Theatre in Vienna. It probably is Salieri’s most important opera. Vicente Martín y Soler, who is famous for his quotation from “Una cosa rara” in Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”, published his opera “L’arbore di Diana” in 1787. The exhibition will present a print of the piano score of the overture and a series of twelve German dances of this opera.
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from © Andreas Roseneder’s “Haydn-patch”-series, 2009:
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The reception of the aria is another essential aspect on which the exhibition will centre. So far three critical scientific editions have been published on this subject – in 1937 by the then head of the music division of “Städtische Sammlungen” (the predecessor of today’s Vienna City Library), in 1961 by the renowned Haydn expert H. C. Robbins Landon and, finally, in 2000 by Robert von Zahn in the scope of a complete edition of Haydn’s works. All three editions will be represented in the exhibition in order to document the increasing knowledge on this particular piece of music, which has been compiled over the years. All exhibits are part of the stock of the Vienna City Library. Complementary texts will provide the visitors of the exhibition with interesting background information.

“Chi vive amante… – Ich weiß, dass derjenige, der als Liebhaber lebt, verrückt ist”
Exhibition to the 200th anniversary of the death of Joseph Haydn
23 January – 3 May 2009
www.mozarthausvienna.at