200 Years, Anniversary Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

haydnmania: the 2009 anniversary

Archive for fame

crazy lovers …

“Chi vive amante… – Ich weiß, dass derjenige, der als Liebhaber lebt, verrückt ist”
(“I know that the one who lives as lover is crazy”)

… is the title of an actually exhibition at Vienna’s Mozarthaus to the 200th anniversary of the death of Joseph Haydn.
amante

Hieronymus Loeschenkohl: Joseph Haydn, Schattenriss, in: Wiener Musik- und Theater-Almanach auf das Jahr 1786 © Signatur G 87278, Mozarthaus Vienna

The main exhibit of the show is a fair-copy autograph score of the insertion aria “Chi vive amante”, which Haydn had composed for Francesco Bianchi’s opera “Alessandro nell’Indie” for the performance at Esterháza Palace in 1787. The exhibition – which is presented in co-operation with the Vienna City Library – focuses on the autograph score of this aria, which was written in the same year as Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”. In addition to this score there will be registers and libretti, which elucidate the historical context between this work and other operas of that era. The libretto of the then Viennese court poet Pietro Metastasio, on which the opera is based, was not only set to music by Bianchi but several other composers as well. Three printed versions of the libretto referring to the compositions by Baldassare Galuppi (1752), Leonardo Vinci (1783) and a community of composers (1773) will be on view.

Another focus is the historical context of this Haydn aria. Operas of other composers, which were created in Vienna at about the same period as the above-mentioned fragment will be presented: Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” of course, of which the facsimile of a score written by Mozart himself will be shown, or a contemporary copy of the score of “Axur, re d’Ormus” by Antonio Salieri, who at that time had just returned to Vienna from Paris. His opera is an adaptation of the French original version entitled “Tarare” for the Imperial Court Theatre in Vienna. It probably is Salieri’s most important opera. Vicente Martín y Soler, who is famous for his quotation from “Una cosa rara” in Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”, published his opera “L’arbore di Diana” in 1787. The exhibition will present a print of the piano score of the overture and a series of twelve German dances of this opera.
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from © Andreas Roseneder’s “Haydn-patch”-series, 2009:
haydn2009_banner_patch

The reception of the aria is another essential aspect on which the exhibition will centre. So far three critical scientific editions have been published on this subject – in 1937 by the then head of the music division of “Städtische Sammlungen” (the predecessor of today’s Vienna City Library), in 1961 by the renowned Haydn expert H. C. Robbins Landon and, finally, in 2000 by Robert von Zahn in the scope of a complete edition of Haydn’s works. All three editions will be represented in the exhibition in order to document the increasing knowledge on this particular piece of music, which has been compiled over the years. All exhibits are part of the stock of the Vienna City Library. Complementary texts will provide the visitors of the exhibition with interesting background information.

“Chi vive amante… – Ich weiß, dass derjenige, der als Liebhaber lebt, verrückt ist”
Exhibition to the 200th anniversary of the death of Joseph Haydn
23 January – 3 May 2009
www.mozarthausvienna.at

Haydn at Esterházy theatre

Haydn directing a performance of his opera Lincontro improvviso in the Esterházy theatre in 1775. ©The Bridgeman Art Library

Haydn directing a performance of his opera L'incontro improvviso in the Esterházy theatre in 1775. ©The Bridgeman Art Library

Guardian’s author Stephen Moss on his “Haydn-Tripp”

An interesting story about his tripp to discover Haydn and “Haydn-Land” wrote Stephen Moss on january 1st 2009 for the “Guardian”.
An article about the “exclusivity” of Haydn – in comparison to Mozart and Beethoven.

– read the article here

– have a look on his pictures here

nicknames for Haydn’s Symphonies

There are many notable work among Haydn’s Symphonies, and many have nicknames of which the following is a brief overview:

  • Symphony No.31 – “The Horn Signal”
  • Symphony No.45 – “The Farewell”
  • Symphonies No.82-87 – “The Paris Symphonies” commissioned by a Paris publishing house
  • Symphony No.82 – “The Bear” from the folk dance style of the last movement
  • Symphony No.83 – “The Hen” has a clucking theme in the first movement
  • Symphony No.85 – “The Queens” since it was enjoyed by Marie Antoinette
  • Symphony No.88 – this has no nickname but is an absolute delight, a perfect gem
  • Symphony No.92 – “The Oxford” for Oxford University
  • Symphonies No.93-104 – “The London Symphonies” composed in groups during Haydn’s visits to the city
  • Symphony No.94 – “The Surpise” is one of the best-known of Haydn’s symphonies and named for the surprisingly loud chord in the slow movement
  • Symphony No.100 – “The Military” features drums and other percussion
  • Symphony No.101 – “The Clock” for it’s ticking sound
  • Symphony No.103 – “The Drum Roll”
  • Symphony No.104 – “The London”

“First Viennese School”: the 3 G’s

The three great classical composers, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, are commonly referred to as the First Viennese School. They never really worked together as a group, though especially Mozart and Haydn knew each other well, and have most certainly influenced each other. For example, Mozart dedicated some string quartets to Haydn, because he valued Haydn’s string quartets so much.

The 6 string quartets (“the Haydn-Quartetts”) Mozart dedicated to Haydn (composed between 1782 – 1785), influenced by Haydn’s “russian quartets”:
string quartet G-Dur KV 387 (1782) – 1st Haydn-Quartet
string quartet d-moll KV 421 (1783) – 2nd Haydn-Quartet
string quartet Es-dur KV 428 (1783) – 3rd Haydn-Quartet
string quartet “Jagd-Quartett” (=”hunting quartet”) B-dur KV 458 (1783) – 4th Haydn-Quartet
string quartet A-dur KV 464 (1785) – 5th Haydn-Quartet
string quartet C- Dur “Dissonanzen-Quartett” KV 465 (1783) – 6th Haydn-Quartet

In general they valued each other very much as composers, and as persons. For Beethoven, who was the “youngest” of the three, the other two were his big examples.

j.h. – young and gifted



Picture: Schloss Harrach, Rohrau, Austria:
1794, during Haydns lifetime, Count Harrach exhibited the first statue made of
Haydn in the park on the castle grounds in Rohrau – where Haydn spent his first five years.

Joseph Haydn about his father and his first encounters with music:
“My late father was a wheelwright by profession and a subject of Count Harrach (from nature a great connoisseur of music). Without reading a note of music he played the harp, and when I was a boy of five I could (sing) repeat all the tunes he played…”

All text taken from: Chapter 1. “Childhood” in the book:

“Joseph Haydn, Great Austrian Composer” incl. Audio-CD – recorded at Schloss Esterházy in Eisenstadt (at Haydnsaal & Empiresaal) with the famous Ensembles “Joseph-Haydn-Streichquartett”, the “Joseph Haydn-Brass”, the “Schloss-Trio Eisenstadt” and the “Esterházy-Ensemble”.

The book is available in 4 languages: german, english, chinese and japanese language!
more about & orderform here

…our “stolen” Haydn-anthem…

…is now used by the Germans as their “official anthem”:

Joseph Haydn composed the “Kaiserhymne” (Emperor’s Hymn) “Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser” (“God Save Emperor Francis”) as an anthem to Francis II, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire which he reigned from Vienna, Austria. Lorenz Leopold Haschka (1749-1827) wrote the lyrics –  Joseph Haydn composed the melody.

The melody is also the second movement of one of Haydn’s most famous string quartets, nicknamed the “Emperor Quartet” (german/original name: “Das Kaiserquartett”). The melody was later used in “Das Lied der Deutschen” (translation: “the song of the germans” – tztztz….), which is still Germany’s national anthem.

Sometimes I’d like to change our actually (and – at least – boring) austrian anthem against the Haydn anthem melody, that really belongs to us! It was written by a person who lived here (not in Germany!).

There’ not much possibilities, but among the less I found one “touching” version of Haydn’s anthem, the 2nd movement of the “string quartet op.76, popularly known as the “Emperor” Quartet (1797), on youtube: