200 Years, Anniversary Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

haydnmania: the 2009 anniversary

Archive for Biografie

HAYDN – DOCTOR OF MUSIC

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HAYDN – DOCTOR OF MUSIC was the title of a concert review in an english newspaper on  11 July 1791.
“Doctor of Musick” conferred upon Haydn at Oxford:

“… At the Theatre that night the audience were in excellent humour; and when Haydn appeared, and, grateful for the applause he received, seized hold of, and displayed, the gown he wore as a mark of the honour that had in the morning been conferred upon him, the silent emphasis with which he thus expressed his feelings, met with an unanimous and loud clapping”…… (13” Page 3 Col 1)

When he came to London Haydn wrote to a friend:
“Everyone wants to know me. I had to dine out six times up to now. I could have an invitation everyday…”

Haydn was the 1st musician who was honoured with the title “doctor” from the Oxford University during his lifetime.

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the Haydn-podcast

Austria’s cultural Broadcasting Station “Ö1” offers a “Haydn-Podcast”: documenting Joseph Haydn’s stations in life.
You may follow Joseph Haydn’s journey through Europe in 44 parts during the anniversary-year 2009.
– here the iTunes-Podcast-link “Seeking Haydn”

crazy lovers …

“Chi vive amante… – Ich weiß, dass derjenige, der als Liebhaber lebt, verrückt ist”
(“I know that the one who lives as lover is crazy”)

… is the title of an actually exhibition at Vienna’s Mozarthaus to the 200th anniversary of the death of Joseph Haydn.
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Hieronymus Loeschenkohl: Joseph Haydn, Schattenriss, in: Wiener Musik- und Theater-Almanach auf das Jahr 1786 © Signatur G 87278, Mozarthaus Vienna

The main exhibit of the show is a fair-copy autograph score of the insertion aria “Chi vive amante”, which Haydn had composed for Francesco Bianchi’s opera “Alessandro nell’Indie” for the performance at Esterháza Palace in 1787. The exhibition – which is presented in co-operation with the Vienna City Library – focuses on the autograph score of this aria, which was written in the same year as Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”. In addition to this score there will be registers and libretti, which elucidate the historical context between this work and other operas of that era. The libretto of the then Viennese court poet Pietro Metastasio, on which the opera is based, was not only set to music by Bianchi but several other composers as well. Three printed versions of the libretto referring to the compositions by Baldassare Galuppi (1752), Leonardo Vinci (1783) and a community of composers (1773) will be on view.

Another focus is the historical context of this Haydn aria. Operas of other composers, which were created in Vienna at about the same period as the above-mentioned fragment will be presented: Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” of course, of which the facsimile of a score written by Mozart himself will be shown, or a contemporary copy of the score of “Axur, re d’Ormus” by Antonio Salieri, who at that time had just returned to Vienna from Paris. His opera is an adaptation of the French original version entitled “Tarare” for the Imperial Court Theatre in Vienna. It probably is Salieri’s most important opera. Vicente Martín y Soler, who is famous for his quotation from “Una cosa rara” in Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”, published his opera “L’arbore di Diana” in 1787. The exhibition will present a print of the piano score of the overture and a series of twelve German dances of this opera.
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from © Andreas Roseneder’s “Haydn-patch”-series, 2009:
haydn2009_banner_patch

The reception of the aria is another essential aspect on which the exhibition will centre. So far three critical scientific editions have been published on this subject – in 1937 by the then head of the music division of “Städtische Sammlungen” (the predecessor of today’s Vienna City Library), in 1961 by the renowned Haydn expert H. C. Robbins Landon and, finally, in 2000 by Robert von Zahn in the scope of a complete edition of Haydn’s works. All three editions will be represented in the exhibition in order to document the increasing knowledge on this particular piece of music, which has been compiled over the years. All exhibits are part of the stock of the Vienna City Library. Complementary texts will provide the visitors of the exhibition with interesting background information.

“Chi vive amante… – Ich weiß, dass derjenige, der als Liebhaber lebt, verrückt ist”
Exhibition to the 200th anniversary of the death of Joseph Haydn
23 January – 3 May 2009
www.mozarthausvienna.at

Haydn at Esterházy theatre

Haydn directing a performance of his opera Lincontro improvviso in the Esterházy theatre in 1775. ©The Bridgeman Art Library

Haydn directing a performance of his opera L'incontro improvviso in the Esterházy theatre in 1775. ©The Bridgeman Art Library

Guardian’s author Stephen Moss on his “Haydn-Tripp”

An interesting story about his tripp to discover Haydn and “Haydn-Land” wrote Stephen Moss on january 1st 2009 for the “Guardian”.
An article about the “exclusivity” of Haydn – in comparison to Mozart and Beethoven.

– read the article here

– have a look on his pictures here

gold watch for the composer’s pen: Haydn & Nelson

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picture: Lord Nelson before Trafalgar

Precisely how the Nelson Mass became so called, when and by whom shall probably never be known. What is at least clear is that within a month of the Battle of the Nile on august 1, 1798. Haydn had completed a Mass in D Minor, and within months of the Battle of Trafalgar ( october 21, 1805) that same mass had become known as the Nelson Mass.

Amongst his other court duties Haydn was required to produce a new mass each year for the name-day of Princess Esterhazy. Two years previously, in the summer of 1798, Haydn had composed a mass in the key of D minor. He could not have known of the Battle of the Nile until weeks after the mass was finished, so the mass was certainly not written for that Nelson victory. The original manuscript of that mass has neither title nor motto, and bears nothing but the pious formulae ‘In nomine Domini’ at the start and ‘Laus Deo’ at the end.

However, both the Mass in D Minor (probably) and the Te Deum (certainly) were performed to honour Nelson during his visit to Eisenstadt in 1800, together with a brief cantata, Lines from the Battle of the Nile, which Haydn composed for Lady Hamilton. Nelson and Haydn apparently became friends – some accounts tell that Nelson gave Haydn a gold watch he had won at Aboukir Bay, in return for the pen that was used to compose Lady Hamilton’s cantata. It is likely that the name Nelson Mass began being applied to this piece some time after this event, although the name was never used by Haydn himself.

“First Viennese School”: the 3 G’s

The three great classical composers, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, are commonly referred to as the First Viennese School. They never really worked together as a group, though especially Mozart and Haydn knew each other well, and have most certainly influenced each other. For example, Mozart dedicated some string quartets to Haydn, because he valued Haydn’s string quartets so much.

The 6 string quartets (“the Haydn-Quartetts”) Mozart dedicated to Haydn (composed between 1782 – 1785), influenced by Haydn’s “russian quartets”:
string quartet G-Dur KV 387 (1782) – 1st Haydn-Quartet
string quartet d-moll KV 421 (1783) – 2nd Haydn-Quartet
string quartet Es-dur KV 428 (1783) – 3rd Haydn-Quartet
string quartet “Jagd-Quartett” (=”hunting quartet”) B-dur KV 458 (1783) – 4th Haydn-Quartet
string quartet A-dur KV 464 (1785) – 5th Haydn-Quartet
string quartet C- Dur “Dissonanzen-Quartett” KV 465 (1783) – 6th Haydn-Quartet

In general they valued each other very much as composers, and as persons. For Beethoven, who was the “youngest” of the three, the other two were his big examples.